Browse Items (8550 total)

http://media.artstor.net/imgstor/size1/sslps/c7732183/9274217.jpg
Date: 3-Jun-13
Source: ARTstor

http://media.artstor.net/imgstor/size1/sslps/c7732183/9274233.jpg
Date: 21-Oct-07
Source: ARTstor

http://media.artstor.net/imgstor/size1/sslps/c7731776/21243342.jpg
Creator: Unknown
Date: c.1940-1960
Subjects:
Prophet, Nancy Elizabeth, 1890-1960
African American artists
Native American artists
Women artists
Source: ARTstor

http://media.artstor.net/imgstor/size1/sslps/c7732183/9274194.jpg
Date: 1-Oct-14
Source: ARTstor

http://media.artstor.net/imgstor/size1/sslps/c7729975/22070617.jpg
Creator: Abrahamson artwork depicted by Blommers, Bernardus Johannes (Dutch painter and etcher, 1845-1914), Dutch
Date: 1907-1914 (publication date)
Subjects:
Postcards
Netherlands
Holland (historical region)
Women
Genre paintings
Seated figures
Sewing
Knitting
Grasses (plants)
Source: ARTstor

http://media.artstor.net/imgstor/size1/sslps/c7729975/22340265.jpg
Creator: Nenke and Ostermaier (publisher, German, act. 1880-1941), Dutch
Date: ca.1907-1914 (publication date)
Subjects:
Postcards
Genre photographs
Ethnic costume
Girls
Netherlands
Dutch
Photochromolithographs
Photochromie
Holland (historical region)
Volendam (North Holland, Netherlands)
Boys
Knitting
Source: ARTstor

http://cdm16013.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getthumbnail/collection/p16013coll18/id/25
Creator: Unidentified photographer
Date: 1886
Subjects:
Portrait photography--Children
Portrait photography--19th century. Baby carriages--1890-1910
Children--Montana--1890-1910
Infants--Montana--1890-1910
Source: Big Sky Country Digital Network

http://cdm16013.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getthumbnail/collection/p15018coll36/id/19843
Creator: Grandma Dailey pioneered it from Iowa to Montana raised family, lived in mud shack, cooked for threshers, built log cabin, died at 86 1948 NEWSPAPER This story concerns "Grandma Dailey" as she was known affection¬ately by most residents of Lewistown. Though she passed away a couple of years ago at the age of 86, her mem¬ory lingers on in the minds of many of the old-timers in Central Montana. The courage with which she faced life in early Montana kept her strong and self-reliant throughout rest of her long and active life. The following are a few of her ex¬periences as they were told to her granddaughter, Dolores Dailey Mee¬han. I came to Montana in 1883. With me were my mother, stepfather and children, and my brother and his family. My husband came in December of that same year. We started from Independence, Iowa, the county seat of Buchanan County in March. The weather was fine when we started. Through the Da¬kotas and eastern Montana, howev¬er the snow was so deep that the engine could not pull the train on a grade, and the men passengers were obliged to get off and shovel snow. At Miles City we had to wait three hours. It was bitterly cold and there was plenty of snow—and no depot. When we arrived In Bozeman we also arrived at the end of the line. We stayed there until March of the following year. Ida Harrington, a cousin, who was also one of our party, taught school three miles out of Bozeman. After she had taught a few weeks, the pupils demanded a spelling school, which I attended. I felt quite proud when I spelled the school down but then I had attended so many such affairs in Iowa and never was spelled down so perhaps it wasn't such an accomplishment after all. Railroad Work Resumed In the spring, work was resumed on the railroad. We lived close to the track, and as many as fif¬teen tramps in a bunch followed the tracks. I was not much noted for courage and when I saw them coming, I took my three weeks old baby, and my other girl, two and a half years old, and climbed into the haymow. I had many such scares. My brother was working for Jo¬seph Jackson on a ranch above where I lived. One day I saw a man running down the road and my brother following in the fields. The man outran my brother, got into the house and started up the stairs. My husband had provided me with a revolver, which I made a great pretense of aiming at the man, but by that time my brother had arrived. He took the man by the collar and marshaled him down the road. He had slept in the chicken house the night before, I guess he was insane. No Furniture Our house was bare of furni¬ture except for some dry goods boxes which we used for chairs, a box with light pieces of board nailed on for legs, which served as a table and our beds. Fortunately I had brought dishes with me. In March 1884, we started for the Judith Basin and Lewistown which was to be my future home. When we arrived at the Shields River a valuable horse belonging to Joseph Jackson, was taken sick. We camp¬ed there for a week while some of the party went back to Bozeman for another horse. While we were camped there, a tick embedded itself behind the ear of my daugh¬ter, Iva. I had never heard of one before and did not know what to do, so I dug it out with a crochet hook. She seemed to be very un¬fortunate for before we left Bozeman, she was very sick with a fever which was called "mountain fever" by the residents. As there was no reliable doctor there, I doctored her as best I could my¬self. We didn't enjoy our week's camping very much. The sick horse had to be cared for and housed. As our family was the smallest they took our tent and we occu¬pied the tent of the Joseph Jackson family. We had nothing to sit on but the rolls of bedding which we rolled up each morning and placed alongside the tent. My baby was heavy to carry, and I often longed for a comfortable place to sit down. One day my husband told me to go into the tent and sit down on a roll of bedding. There was a nice fat one close to the flap and it looked so tempting I immediately chose it and sat down with the baby. There was a slight move¬ment and everyone began to laugh, a man was inside the roll I was often the butt of such jokes be¬cause I was a tenderfoot. I soon learned to take them, however. Crossed 16-Mile Canyon When the men arrived with another horse, we made another start. I was obliged to take in my wagon, the young colts and calves that could not travel. When we crossed Sixteen Mile creek, which was very high at the time, one colt was drowned. I drove a three year colt that we had just broken. Coming down the long narrow backbone called "Devil's Back¬bone" I heard a noise and thought there was something wrong with the chickens we had in a box be¬hind. On investigation, however I found that the bedding had fallen down on the children. They would have smothered if I had not looked to see what had caused the racket. After a long and tedious journey we arrived in Lewistown on the first day of June. The post office, a store, saloon and a hotel was all the town there was. Until our par¬ty arrived there were only five white women living there, and no houses except those which had been built out of dry goods boxes and scraps of lumber, so we lived in a tent until we bought a right for a homestead in which is now South Lewistown. We rented a piece of ground and planted pota¬toes June 9, which made a fine crop. On our homestead, we moved in¬to a house made of small poplar poles and a dirt roof. One room even had a dirt floor. The door was so low that we were obliged to duck our heads on entering. It had no fastening. I whittled out a button with a butcher knife. The windows were merely holes, about two feet square. Killed Mountain Rat I had never seen, nor heard of a Mountain rat. One day, I heard a noise like someone walking in the other room. I cautiously in¬vestigated and saw something walking on two feet, carrying an egg in its front paws. An old hen had flown in the glassless window and made her nest in the corner. The rat had stolen her egg. I in-stantly gave chase, rescued the egg, and killed the what I call¬ed----trophy. I tacked him on the house for exhibition. I had to keep him six weeks, however, for my, husband had gone back to Bozeman for supplies, fell in with a threshing crew and ran the separator until they finished the run. I never heard from him in all that time and had no idea what was keeping him so long. Things like that were to be expected in those days, and had to be accepted as though they didn't matter. One day, I, missed one of my woolen stockings I had knit for the children. I could not account for its disappearance. One morning I saw the stocking moving in a crack of the floor. I surely thought there were "spooks", but caught it in time. Then I bravely proceeded to remove the board, and rescued a good many things which my friend, the rat, had hidden there. The cracks were so large in the floor that the scissors dropped through. When my mother, as a present sent some material for dresses for the children, I laid it on the floor and cut out the dresses with a borrowed axe. Doctor Bumps Head. My husband was taken very ill one night and the only way to get a doctor was for me to go after him. I was gone from the house just twenty-five minutes, covering a distance of nearly three miles. When the doctor came he had not been advised as to the height of the door. Consequently, he was afflicted with a sore head for sev¬eral days. When we arrived in the Basin, we did not expect a Fourth of July celebration, but we got it, never-the-less. We all went to the home of Joseph Jackson, in town. Maggie Barger, a young girl, said they were having fireworks down town, and the "pilgrims" were run¬ning. Just then the men burst in¬to the house, very white. My old¬est daughter was playing in the yard. Without thinking to put down the baby, in my fright, I ran out after Iva. As I picked her up a bullet whizzed over my head. Mercy Jackson and Jessie Ellis, two title girls, were hobbled like horses. They crawled into the house and one of the men cut them loose. Fight Recalled Rattlesnake Jake and a man, whose last name was Olsen [Owen], two outlaws, were the cause of all the excitement. They shot and killed Ben Smith, who was standing close enough to my husband to strike him as he fell. Finally a man shot through a crack in the saloon door and he hit one of the outlaws. The two had picked a quarrel with a half-breed, Bob Jackson. They com¬pelled him to get down and crawl like a snake. He had presence of mind enough to crawl into his cabin, get his rifle, and shoot the other man. They were very game after being shot, and continued to fire their pistols, one in each hand, until they died. The men put chains around their necks and dragged them out of town and buried them. The women did not approve of this so they were brought back and put in rude boxes of rough lumber. There was not even a minister to preach a funeral sermon over the body of the driver. There was an undertaker, however, Charles Rich¬ards, who made his coffin. Two men from Gallatin Valley had arrived that morning in quest of land. They were Joseph Spragg and Frank Gillet. They hid under a bridge until the shooting was over. I don't blame them. I'd have crawled under a bridge too, if I had one handy! They decid¬ed they didn't want land here. Indians Fought Nearby Another thing to prove how wild the country was at this time was an Indian battle ground right be¬hind our house. The battle must have been a short time before, be¬cause we found the bodies of five Indians which were buried on the limbs of a large fir tree close to the house. They were wrapped in buffalo hides. All their possessions had been placed with them were clam shells, pieces of knives, earrings and beads. We also found many arrowheads, and continued to find them for years. In the fall of 1884, settlers came. A Frenchman started a little store. His wife was part Cree Indian. He could not read or write, but charged some accounts. My husband asked him how he could keep track of who owed a bill. The man answered that he drew a picture of him. I milked cows and sold milk, cream and butter at the hotel. When my husband was gone, I had a hard time getting the cows on account of the children. The old¬est one would not stay at the house and I had to take her on my horse with me. Sometimes I took both of them. During the year 1885, a man came to the door and asked for my husband. I feigned ignorance as to his whereabouts, as I had not gained much courage yet. The man left, but came back again that night. I shoved my husband into the other room and would not tell him anything. (I had not gotten over the scare of July 4, 1884.) When my husband heard the man's voice, he recognized it and came out from hiding. He was sub¬poenaed on a case. Roof Became Mud Not long after this occurrence, there was a house warming and a dance. My husband was playing. This same man, Johnnie Flyn, by name, asked for an introduction, and said he would die to dance with me. When there was a pause in the music and dancing, he told the crowd about my scare. I vowed then and there, to overcome my timidness, but I didn't always succeed.During this same year, it rain¬ed steadily for three days and three nights. The steady downpour turned the roof of our cabin into a mud puddle. The mud that dropped down, all stayed on the floor because the boards were laid flat on the ground and there was no place for it to run out. The legs of the bedstead shoved out and our bedding lay in the mud until it stopped raining. Then we shoveled out. My refrigerator consisted of pegs driven in the wall with twigs laid across them for shelves, on which I set my milk and cream. Nothing could save the cream, however. It was thrown out with the rest of the mess. Calamity Jane Visits Also in 1885 Calamity Jane vis¬ited Lewistown. She was dressed in a man's red flannel shirt, with sleeves rolled up and a short, full skirt. She was a great favorite with the children. In 1886, there was a Christmas tree at the Day House hotel. A Portuguese came to me and said, 'You look sick. I 'fraid you die. I weel put a new roof on your house. I saw my husband on the other side of the room and decided I liked that side best. My son was born the next June, and we needed that new roof badly but we didn’t get it. It rained and we were obliged to set pans on the bed to catch the water. When my son was two months old, we were so proud of him that we took him to Bozeman in a lumber wagon to get his picture taken. We had a four horse team. On account of the narrow road, one of the wheelers stepped off from the grade in Bridger canyon. The wagon very nearly went down. My husband jumped on, the wheel on the upper side and yelled for ¬me to jump, forgetting the little ones in behind. But I didn't jump. Somehow I got the children out. Then my brother-in-law, who was coming behind with a four horse team, coming behind with a four horse team, took his team upon the side hill and pulled our wagon onto the road. It was seventy-five feet to the bottom of the canyon. Husband Falls Sick When we came back we had a load of flour and no tent. The flour was very cold to sleep on. My husband got very sick too. We camped in Bridger canyon, where the snow was two feet deep. My brother-in-law, David Taff, and I were up all night doctoring him and trying to make medicine over a camp fire. I have done all kinds of work. Nursing, walking to town, one and a fourth miles, and working all day, going home in the evening to care for my children of which I had five. I have followed thresh¬ing machines and cooked for forty men. That was before all this modern machinery came into use. My children and I bucked straw when help was scarce, riding the buck pole. I broke a bronco for a man who was afraid to ride him, and received sixty-five dollars’ worth of black walnut furniture. That was in 1888, and I still have some of it. We built a log house one and a half stories high, in 1888. I helped to lay the logs up. I laid the floors, chinked and daubed the, cracks, and moved the household goods front the old cabin (which we were to use as a granary) on a wheelbarrow. My husband was running a threshing machine. Often times he'd be gone for weeks: and I heard no word from him. Once the crew pulled in unexpectedly, at one o'clock in the night. I had to get up and get supper for them
Date: 1948
Subjects:
Documents
Source: Big Sky Country Digital Network

https://arc.lib.montana.edu/msu-photos/objects/thumb-parc-001324.jpg
Creator: Allison Lighthall Photographers
Date: 1894-2015
Subjects:
4-H Clubs--Montana
Source: Big Sky Country Digital Network

http://cdm16013.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getthumbnail/collection/p16013coll93/id/32
Creator: Harvey, Glenwood, 1923-2015
Date: 1941
Subjects:
Civilian Conservation Corps (U.S.)
Source: Big Sky Country Digital Network

http://cdm16013.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getthumbnail/collection/p103401pblhc/id/435
Creator: Unknown
Subjects:
Pioneers--Montana--Yellowstone County--Billings. Brown, Michael. First Congregational Church (Billings, Mont.) Daughters of the American Revolution. Montana State Society. American Red Cross--1880-1920. Reynolds, Carrie (Mrs.). Reynolds, SG. Crow Indian Reservation (Mont.) Indian agents' spouses
Source: Big Sky Country Digital Network

http://cdm16013.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getthumbnail/collection/p267301coll3/id/4025
Creator: Cameron, Evelyn, 1868-1928
Date: 12/11/1921
Subjects:
Folger, Lillian
Folger, N.C
Knitting--Montana
Living rooms--Montana
Reading--Montana
Source: Big Sky Country Digital Network

http://cdm16013.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getthumbnail/collection/p103401pblhc/id/738
Creator: Unknown
Date: 1918
Subjects:
Pioneers--Montana--Yellowstone County. Bakers. Knitters (Persons). Red Cross
Source: Big Sky Country Digital Network

http://cdm16013.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getthumbnail/collection/p16013coll93/id/16
Creator: Boze, Elmer E.(Elmer Elwood), 1916-2016
Date: 1935
Subjects:
Horses
Portraits, Group
Civilian Conservation Corps (U.S.)
Source: Big Sky Country Digital Network

http://cdm16013.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getthumbnail/collection/p16013coll93/id/92
Creator: Rydosz, Michael (Michael George), 1917-2005
Date: 1937; 1938
Subjects:
Portraits, Group
Trucks
Automobiles
Civilian Conservation Corps (U.S.)
Source: Big Sky Country Digital Network

http://cdm16013.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getthumbnail/collection/p16013coll93/id/128
Creator: Rydosz, Michael (Michael George), 1917-2005
Date: 1937; 1938
Subjects:
Bears
Wildlife management
Civilian Conservation Corps (U.S.)
Source: Big Sky Country Digital Network

http://cdm16013.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getthumbnail/collection/p16013coll93/id/95
Creator: Rydosz, Michael (Michael George), 1917-2005
Date: 1937; 1938
Subjects:
Portraits, Group
Civilian Conservation Corps (U.S.)
Source: Big Sky Country Digital Network

http://cdm16013.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getthumbnail/collection/p16013coll93/id/19
Creator: Boze, Elmer E.(Elmer Elwood), 1916-2016
Date: 1935
Subjects:
Portraits, Group
Civilian Conservation Corps (U.S.)
Source: Big Sky Country Digital Network

http://cdm16013.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getthumbnail/collection/p267301coll3/id/4172
Creator: Cameron, Evelyn, 1868-1928
Date: 1923
Subjects:
Otis, Billy
Infants--Montana
Tricycles--Montana
Source: Big Sky Country Digital Network

http://cdm16013.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getthumbnail/collection/p103401pblhc/id/434
Creator: Unknown
Subjects:
Pioneers--Montana--Yellowstone County--Billings. Brown, Michael. First Congregational Church (Billings, Mont.) Daughters of the American Revolution. Montana State Society. American Red Cross--1880-1920. Reynolds, Carrie (Mrs.). Reynolds, SG. Crow Indian Reservation (Mont.) Indian agents' spouses
Source: Big Sky Country Digital Network

http://cdm16013.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getthumbnail/collection/p16013coll93/id/60
Creator: Kramer, Richard S. (Richard Scott), 1916-2002
Date: 1935
Subjects:
Portraits
Civilian Conservation Corps (U.S.)
Source: Big Sky Country Digital Network

http://cdm16013.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getthumbnail/collection/p16013coll93/id/34
Creator: Harvey, Glenwood, 1923-2015
Date: 1941
Subjects:
Deer
Civilian Conservation Corps (U.S.)
Source: Big Sky Country Digital Network

http://cdm16013.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getthumbnail/collection/p16013coll93/id/77
Creator: Kramer, Richard S. (Richard Scott), 1916-2002
Date: 1935
Subjects:
Owls
Strigidae
Civilian Conservation Corps (U.S.)
Source: Big Sky Country Digital Network
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